Friday, June 19, 2015

What makes Jaew Bong so Good. Best Asian Condiment in the World. Jaew Bong And Its Deliciousness.

Jaew Bong And Its Deliciousness



Why this Laotian condiment chili paste has become a hit with culinary enthusiasts around the world?

If you have ever been to Southeast Asia, Laos in particular, you have probably tasted the rich and flavorful Jaew Bong (pronounced “jail,” ) dipping sauce. The delicious paste is a staple in Lao cuisine, with more and more Westerners falling in love with the chili paste after visiting the area. It is packed with so many rich flavors it can be overwhelming.  It is spicy, salty and sweet all at the same time and goes well with a variety of dishes.  Jaew Bong (in Lao, it is referred to as ແຈ່ວບອງ).   For hundreds of years, a Laotian Farmer or Fisherman would simply pack a small basket of sticky rice (which is a staple of Laos food), dried fish and jaew bong before heading out to work.  Jaew Bong then and now can be kept in a room temperature and simply has a long shelf life.  It is a condiment that takes any dish and makes it unforgettably scrumptious.

Sometimes seen as Jeow or Jaeo, there are different versions of the paste in Thailand and Cambodia, but its purpose is always the same – it is a dipping sauce that adds remarkable flavor to sticky rice or any other foods that are bland. The paste is an essential part of any Lao meal and the varieties are endless, ranging from simple blends of chili and salt to more in-depth recipes that are handed down from generation to generation in families.

Although there are many variations for the spicy paste, Jaew Bong in particular is a pickled chili paste that can be used with anything that a Westerner would usually eat with hot sauce or ketchup.  And since it is pickled and the presence of chili, oil, salt and citrus acid, the paste stays fresh for several months at room temperature.


Most recently Western chefs have been using it as cooking oil… We urge you to explore your new go to kitchen secret weapon! 

Discover more about Jaew Bong, check out www.jaewbong.com



Enjoy..



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Thursday, February 19, 2015

How to Make Vietnamese Crisp-fried Tofu in a Tangy Tomato Sauce Asian Cooking Recipe Cuisine

Vietnam Crisp-fried Tofu in a Tangy Tomato Sauce

This recipe was taken from centuries old cooking techniques and when possible applied modern cooking methods and/or ingredients.  It uses Asian cooking styles, Asian Spices, Asian Sauces and Asian Ingredients.  The style of cooking may have a slight alteration while still maintaining the dish's overall purpose.  In this blog we touch on recipes that may be predominant for the Chinese Cuisines.  We will also share recipes based upon country, or regions such as: Burma, Cambodia, Indian, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet and Vietnam.  Some cuisines are considered South Asian, South East Asian, Central Asian and/or Middle Eastern and may not be strictly connected to a specific country or culture.

Recipe Makes for 4 Servings:

peanut oil for deep-frying

1 lb firm tofu, rinsed and cut into bitesize cubes

1 Thai chili, seeded and chopped

1 oz fresh root ginger, peeled and finely chopped

4 garlic cloves, finely chopped

6 large ripe tomatoes, skinned, seeded and finely chopped

2 tbsp fish sauce

2 tsp sugar

mint leaves and strips of red chili, to garnish

Directions:

Heat enough oil for deep-frying in a wok or heavy pan. Fry the tofu, in batches, until crisp and golden. Remove with a slotted spoon and drain on kitchen paper.

Reserve 2 tbsp oil in the wok. Add the shallots, chili, ginger and garlic and stir fry until fragrant. Stir in the tomatoes, fish sauce and sugar. Reduce the heat and simmer for 10-15 minutes until it resembles a sauce. Stir in half a cup of water and bring to a boil.


Season with a little pepper and return tofu to the pan. Mix well and simmer gently for 2-3 minutes to heat through. Garnish with mint leaves and chili strips and serve immediately.



For the adventurous palate, a great side dish that compliments this recipe is Jaew Bong.  Discover more about Jaew Bong, check out www.jaewbong.com



Enjoy..



Have an Asian dish of your own? Or you tried using our recipe? Please send us a picture, we would love to post it! email pix to avarecipes@gmail.com
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How to Make Filipino Stuffed Eggplant Asian Cooking Recipe Cuisine

Philippines Rellenong Talong (Stuffed Eggplant)

This recipe was taken from centuries old cooking techniques and when possible applied modern cooking methods and/or ingredients.  It uses Asian cooking styles, Asian Spices, Asian Sauces and Asian Ingredients.  The style of cooking may have a slight alteration while still maintaining the dish's overall purpose.  In this blog we touch on recipes that may be predominant for the Chinese Cuisines.  We will also share recipes based upon country, or regions such as: Burma, Cambodia, Indian, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet and Vietnam.  Some cuisines are considered South Asian, South East Asian, Central Asian and/or Middle Eastern and may not be strictly connected to a specific country or culture.

Recipe Makes for 4 Servings:

2 eggplants (aubergines), halved lengthways

2 teaspoons salt

1 tablespoon oil

3 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 onion, finely chopped

250 g (9 oz) minced (ground) pork

1 large ripe tomato, chopped

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

80 g (2¾ oz/1 cup) fresh breadcrumbs

1 egg, beaten

dry breadcrumbs for coating

oil for frying

Directions:

Put the eggplant and 1 cup water in a saucepan with 1 teaspoon of the salt. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat to low and simmer until tender but not too soft. 

Remove the eggplant from the water and place over paper towel, cut sides down, to drain. Scoop out some of the flesh, leaving a firm shell. Finely chop the flesh and set aside.

Heat the oil in a large heavy-based frying pan over low heat. Add the garlic and onion and cook until golden. Add the pork and stir-fry until it changes colour.

Add the tomato, pepper and remaining salt and cook for 15 minutes. Add the eggplant pulp and continue cooking until the mixture starts to dry out. Remove from the heat, stir in the fresh breadcrumbs, taste and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper, if desired.

Divide the mixture among the eggplant halves to fill each one, then brush over the tops with the egg and scatter over the dry breadcrumbs to coat.


Heat the oil in a large heavy-based saucepan over medium heat. Add the eggplants and cook on one side for 10 minutes, before gently turning and cooking the top until golden. Serve hot.



For the adventurous palate, a great side dish that compliments this recipe is Jaew Bong.  Discover more about Jaew Bong, check out www.jaewbong.com



Enjoy..



Have an Asian dish of your own? Or you tried using our recipe? Please send us a picture, we would love to post it! email pix to cook@avagroups.info
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How to Make Sri Lankan Beef Smoore Asian Cooking Recipe Cuisine

Sri Lanka Mas Ismoru (Beef Smoore)

This recipe was taken from centuries old cooking techniques and when possible applied modern cooking methods and/or ingredients.  It uses Asian cooking styles, Asian Spices, Asian Sauces and Asian Ingredients.  The style of cooking may have a slight alteration while still maintaining the dish's overall purpose.  In this blog we touch on recipes that may be predominant for the Chinese Cuisines.  We will also share recipes based upon country, or regions such as: Burma, Cambodia, Indian, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet and Vietnam.  Some cuisines are considered South Asian, South East Asian, Central Asian and/or Middle Eastern and may not be strictly connected to a specific country or culture.

Recipe Makes for 6-8 Servings:

1.5 kg (3 lb 5 oz) silverside or round steak (in one piece)

2 onions, finely chopped

6 garlic cloves, finely chopped

1 tablespoon finely chopped fresh ginger

1 cinnamon stick

10 curry leaves

1 stem lemongrass or 2 strips lemon zest

3 tablespoons Ceylon curry powder

½ teaspoon fenugreek seeds

125 ml (4 fl oz/½ cup) vinegar

½ pickled lime or lemon

500 ml (17 fl oz/2 cups) thin coconut milk

1 teaspoon ground turmeric

2 teaspoons chilli powder, or to taste

2 teaspoons salt, or to taste

250 ml (8½ fl oz/1 cup) thick coconut milk

50 g (1¾ oz) ghee

Directions:

Pierce the meat all over with a skewer and put in a large saucepan with all the ingredients except the thick coconut milk and ghee. 

Cover and simmer gently for 1½ –2 hours, or until the meat is tender. Add the thick coconut milk and cook, uncovered, for a further 15 minutes. Remove the meat to a serving dish and, if the gravy is too thin, reduce by boiling rapidly. Transfer the gravy to a bowl.


Heat the ghee in the cleaned pan over low heat. Add the beef and brown on all sides, then return the gravy to the pan and heat through. Serve while warm.



For the adventurous palate, a great side dish that compliments this recipe is Jaew Bong.  Discover more about Jaew Bong, check out www.jaewbong.com



Enjoy..



Have an Asian dish of your own? Or you tried using our recipe? Please send us a picture, we would love to post it! email pix to cook@avagroups.info
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How to Make Korean Saewoo Bokum Asian Cooking Recipe Cuisine

Korea Saewoo Bokum (Green Beans with Prawns)


This recipe was taken from centuries old cooking techniques and when possible applied modern cooking methods and/or ingredients.  It uses Asian cooking styles, Asian Spices, Asian Sauces and Asian Ingredients.  The style of cooking may have a slight alteration while still maintaining the dish's overall purpose.  In this blog we touch on recipes that may be predominant for the Chinese Cuisines.  We will also share recipes based upon country, or regions such as: Burma, Cambodia, Indian, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet and Vietnam.  Some cuisines are considered South Asian, South East Asian, Central Asian and/or Middle Eastern and may not be strictly connected to a specific country or culture.

Recipe Makes for 6 Servings:

500 g (1 lb 2 oz) small raw prawns (shrimp), peeled and deveined

500 g (1 lb 2 oz) fresh green beans, trimmed

2 tablespoons vegetable oil

1 tablespoon sesame oil

1 onion, thinly sliced

60 ml (2 fl oz/¼ cup) light soy sauce

1 teaspoon sugar

3 teaspoons toasted, crushed sesame seeds

Directions:

Roughly chop the prawns and set aside. Cut the beans into thin diagonal slices.

Heat the vegetable and sesame oils in a wok or large heavy-based frying pan over high heat. Add the onion and the prawn meat and stir-fry for 2 minutes, then add the beans and stir-fry for a further 3 minutes.


Add the soy sauce, sugar and sesame seeds and toss to combine, then cover and simmer over low heat for 6–8 minutes, or until the beans are just tender – they must not be overcooked. Serve immediately with rice.



For the adventurous palate, a great side dish that compliments this recipe is Jaew Bong.  Discover more about Jaew Bong, check out www.jaewbong.com.



Enjoy..



Have an Asian dish of your own? Or you tried using our recipe? Please send us a picture, we would love to post it! email pix to cook@avagroups.info
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How to Make Burmese Lephet Thoke Asian Cooking Recipe Cuisine

Myanmar Lephet Thoke (Fermented Tea Leaf Salad)


This recipe was taken from centuries old cooking techniques and when possible applied modern cooking methods and/or ingredients.  It uses Asian cooking styles, Asian Spices, Asian Sauces and Asian Ingredients.  The style of cooking may have a slight alteration while still maintaining the dish's overall purpose.  In this blog we touch on recipes that may be predominant for the Chinese Cuisines.  We will also share recipes based upon country, or regions such as: Burma, Cambodia, Indian, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet and Vietnam.  Some cuisines are considered South Asian, South East Asian, Central Asian and/or Middle Eastern and may not be strictly connected to a specific country or culture.

Recipe Makes for 2-4 Servings:

4 tbsp lephet or fermented tea leaves

3 cloves garlic, sliced and deep-fried till crisp

1 bird's eye chili, finely chopped

2 tbsp dried shrimps, soaked and blended to powdery fluff

2 tbsp roasted peanuts

1 tbsp toasted sesame seeds

2 tsp lime juice

2 tsp fish sauce

1 tbsp peanut oil

Directions:


Combine all ingredients in a bowl and mix them thoroughly as with a conventional salad.



For the adventurous palate, a great side dish that compliments this recipe is Jaew Bong.  Discover more about Jaew Bong, check out www.jaewbong.com.



Enjoy..



Have an Asian dish of your own? Or you tried using our recipe? Please send us a picture, we would love to post it! email pix to cook@avagroups.info
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How to Make Indian Cornish Hens with Rum and Saffron Asian Cooking Recipe Cuisine

India Cornish Hens with Rum and Saffron


This recipe was taken from centuries old cooking techniques and when possible applied modern cooking methods and/or ingredients.  It uses Asian cooking styles, Asian Spices, Asian Sauces and Asian Ingredients.  The style of cooking may have a slight alteration while still maintaining the dish's overall purpose.  In this blog we touch on recipes that may be predominant for the Chinese Cuisines.  We will also share recipes based upon country, or regions such as: Burma, Cambodia, Indian, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet and Vietnam.  Some cuisines are considered South Asian, South East Asian, Central Asian and/or Middle Eastern and may not be strictly connected to a specific country or culture.

Recipe Makes for 6-8 Servings:

3 tablespoons canola oil

1 teaspoon cumin seeds

2 large yellow onions, sliced thin

4 cloves garlic, minced

1 (2-inch) piece fresh ginger, peeled and minced

2 (1-inch) pieces cassia

2 whole black cardamom pods

3 or 4 whole cloves

1 bay leaf

2 tablespoons ground coriander

1 tablespoon roasted ground cumin

½ teaspoon turmeric

1 teaspoon ground Indian red chile*

2 fresh tomatoes, diced

2 whole peeled canned tomatoes, crushed

⅓ cup juice from the canned tomatoes

⅓ cup plain yogurt, store-bought or homemade

1½ teaspoons salt

2 serrano chiles, sliced in half lengthwise

½ cup dark rum

½ teaspoon saffron threads

3 (1½-pound) Cornish hens, skinned and cut into 8 pieces, including wings

⅓ cup chopped cilantro

Directions:

Before prepping the ingredients, turn the slow cooker on to the high setting for 15 minutes, until the insert is warmed through.

In a skillet, heat the oil over high heat, with a lid handy. Tilt the pan to pool the oil and carefully add the cumin seeds; cover immediately to avoid splattering.

When the sputtering subsides, add the sliced onions and brown for about 10 minutes over medium-high heat. Add the garlic, ginger, cassia, cardamom, cloves, and bay leaf to the browned onions and sauté for 1 minute before transferring to the slow cooker.

Set the skillet aside. In the bowl of the cooker, combine the sautéed onions with the ground coriander and cumin, turmeric, red chile, fresh and canned tomatoes, tomato juice, yogurt, salt, serrano chiles, rum, and saffron. Mix well.

Use the saved skillet to sear the hen pieces in batches; place them in the slow cooker and turn them in the spice mix. Arrange them as uniformly as possible. Turn the cooker to low, cover, and cook for 3½ hours. 


Turn the cooker to warm, and remove the cassia pieces, cardamom, cloves, and bay leaf. Stir in the cilantro when ready to serve.



For the adventurous palate, a great side dish that compliments this recipe is Jaew Bong.  Discover more about Jaew Bong, check out www.jaewbong.com.



Enjoy..



Have an Asian dish of your own? Or you tried using our recipe? Please send us a picture, we would love to post it! email pix to cook@avagroups.info
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How to Make Thai Pumpkin and Coconut Soup Asian Cooking Recipe Cuisine

Thailand Pumpkin and Coconut Soup

This recipe was taken from centuries old cooking techniques and when possible applied modern cooking methods and/or ingredients.  It uses Asian cooking styles, Asian Spices, Asian Sauces and Asian Ingredients.  The style of cooking may have a slight alteration while still maintaining the dish's overall purpose.  In this blog we touch on recipes that may be predominant for the Chinese Cuisines.  We will also share recipes based upon country, or regions such as: Burma, Cambodia, Indian, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet and Vietnam.  Some cuisines are considered South Asian, South East Asian, Central Asian and/or Middle Eastern and may not be strictly connected to a specific country or culture.


Recipe Makes for 6 Servings:

1 lb ripe pumpkin

3 cups water or chicken stock

2 tbsp Tom Yum Paste or Laksa Paste

1 13 oz. can coconut milk

fish sauce or salt

lime juice to taste

a few small basil leaves

Directions:

Peel and dice the pumpkin, discarding any seeds. Bring water or stock to a boil and stir in the paste. Add a quarter of the coconut milk and diced pumpkin. Simmer until pumpkin is tender.

Stir in the rest of the coconut milk and mash some of the pumpkin to give thickness to the soup. Taste and adjust the seasoning, if necessary, with a dash of fish sauce or salt and a little lime juice. 


Ladle into bowls and scatter basil leaves over when serving.



For the adventurous palate, a great side dish that compliments this recipe is Jaew Bong.  Discover more about Jaew Bong, check out www.jaewbong.com.



Enjoy..



Have an Asian dish of your own? Or you tried using our recipe? Please send us a picture, we would love to post it! email pix to cook@avagroups.info
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How to Make Chinese Velvet Chicken Asian Cooking Recipe Cuisine

China Velvet Chicken



This recipe was taken from centuries old cooking techniques and when possible applied modern cooking methods and/or ingredients.  It uses Asian cooking styles, Asian Spices, Asian Sauces and Asian Ingredients.  The style of cooking may have a slight alteration while still maintaining the dish's overall purpose.  In this blog we touch on recipes that may be predominant for the Chinese Cuisines.  We will also share recipes based upon country, or regions such as: Burma, Cambodia, Indian, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Philippines, Singapore, Sri Lanka, Taiwan, Thailand, Tibet and Vietnam.  Some cuisines are considered South Asian, South East Asian, Central Asian and/or Middle Eastern and may not be strictly connected to a specific country or culture.

Recipe Makes for 4 Servings:

1 tbsp Chinese rice wine or dry sherry

2 teaspoons cornstarch

1 large egg white


1 pound boneless, skinless chicken breasts, cut into ¼-inch-thick slices

1 quart water

2 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 teaspoon minced fresh ginger

4 ounces snow peas, hard ends trimmed

1 teaspoon sesame oil

½ teaspoon sugar

Salt and ground white pepper

Directions:

 In a small bowl, stir together the rice wine and cornstarch until the cornstarch is dissolved; be sure it is fully dissolved or else it can turn clumpy when added to the egg.

In a medium bowl, lightly beat the egg white for a few seconds. (It should not be beaten enough to turn frothy.) Add the cornstarch mixture to the beaten egg white and stir until the mixture is dissolved. 

Add the chicken and stir gently to coat. Cover and let stand in the refrigerator for 30 minutes so that the coating can adhere to the chicken.

Bring the water to a boil in a deep pot or saucepan. Stir in 1 tablespoon of the peanut oil (this will help prevent the chicken slices from sticking to one another), then reduce the heat to a very gentle simmer.

With a slotted spoon, carefully add the chicken and lightly stir for about 2 minutes, until the coating is white but the chicken is not yet cooked through. Drain the chicken in a colander and shake out the excess water.

Heat a wok or large skillet over medium-high heat until a bead of water sizzles and evaporates on contact.

Add the remaining 1 tablespoon peanut oil and swirl to coat the bottom. Add the garlic and ginger and stir-fry until aromatic, about 30 seconds.

Add the snow peas and stir-fry for about 3 minutes, or until crisp-tender and still bright green. Drizzle on the sesame oil and sprinkle the sugar over the snow peas. 


Add the chicken and stir-fry for another 1 to 2 minutes, or until the chicken is cooked through and still white all around. Add salt and white pepper to taste. Transfer to a plate and serve.



For the adventurous palate, a great side dish that compliments this recipe is Jaew Bong.  Discover more about Jaew Bong, check out www.jaewbong.com.



Enjoy..



Have an Asian dish of your own? Or you tried using our recipe? Please send us a picture, we would love to post it! email pix to cook@avagroups.info
Subscribe To Our Social Networks! Share with your friends your amazing dish, you just made!